Subscribe by Email

Your email:

Coach's Questions

Send in your question and we will connect with an expert or two to get you an answer!

Wall Mount Dip Station - New At Rogers Athletic

dip station

Get Strong

Current Articles | RSS Feed RSS Feed

Squat Like A Pro

When you use the Pendulum Squat Pro you are always able to squat with excellent form. Squat like a Pro with Pendulum. Get Strong.

Squat like a pro

Pendulum Squat Pro

The Pendulum Squat Pro

West Virginia Mountaineer Women

West Virginia Mountaineer Women

IMG 0655

Strength training on the Pendulum Seated Squat in Morgantown, West Virginia to Get Strong.  

Grip Cart

New York Jets Pendulum Grip Cart 

NY Jets grip Cart 1

NY Jets grip Cart2

Wrist Roller Shape

The shape of an object influences our finger and wrist joint posture when we grasp it. This subsequently alters the grip force distribution of the hand during maximal power grip tasks.

When training the hands the type of wrist roller affects the maximal grip force that can be achieved.  The contour, size and surface area of the implement increases the user's torque and dictates which muscles are affected which contributes to the exerciser's ultimate physical capacity.

describe the image

Normal force and contact area can be explained by the interaction between handle size and hand size. Hand area can be estimated by hand length times width. Knowing different muscle coordination strategies are used depending on a wrist rollers shape, Rogers Athletics has developed elliptical, circular, cubical and double-frustum wrist rollers of different thicknesses for exercising specific regions of the fingers, hands, wrists and forearms.

describe the image

Having the ability to train the various types of anatomical grips i.e., precision, pinch, hook, ball, power, abduction and adduction with the appropriate tool maximizes hand strength. Filling your grip cart with an implement for each of the above said movements and educating each athlete how to utilize each roller insures that the trainee develops all the structures of the hand fully.

describe the image

Choose from a wide variety of wrist rollers to fill your grip cart. 

describe the image

The following are a few of the many types of wrist rollers available from Rogers to Get Strong.

power grip 

Large Ergonomic Power Grip

small power grip

Natural Power Grip

ball grip

Ball Grip

pinch grip

Rogers large Pinch Grip Wrist Roller 

Penn State Wrestling

Penn State Wrestlers Get Strong

describe the image

Pendulum 4 Way Head and Neck Machine

IMG 20150730 142532531

Pendulum Hip Press

MX 4 Heavy-duty Modular Training System

The MX-4 is a heavy-duty modular training tool built for the toughest competitor, soldier or weightlifer. Built by Rogers Athletics, Tyler Hobson, and steel donated by the Semper-Fi Fund, the goal was achieved in creating a multi-station strength training system, that was wheelchair accessible, but one that did not compromise the demands of performance athletes.

lagombeige.jpg

describe the image

MX 4 Hobson

MX 4 Jossan Warrior Medical

https://www.dropbox.com/s/9i2man5j2xrnkxo/wmf%20movie.mp4?dl=0

Tags: 

Neck Muscle Strength, Bracing And Training The System

describe the imageMike Gittleson was the Director of Strength & Conditioning at the University of Michigan for 30 years and was a part of 15 Football Championships in that time. He explains, developing one area and neglecting another is not conducive to optimal athletic performance.

On January 31, 2014 the American Journal of Sports Medicine published an article on neck strength titled, Effect of Neck Muscle Strength and Anticipatory Cervical Muscle Activation on the Kinematic Response of the Head to Impulsive Loads. The findings indicated that male and female athletes could potentially modify risk factors for concussion by developing neck musculature. It was shown that having greater neck strength when bracing for impact reduces the magnitude of the head’s kinematic response. The anticipatory act of bracing for a violent collision is important in protecting oneself from the effects of whiplash, yet bracing in itself is a common occurrence.  When you run, neck muscles contract before your foot hits the ground. The process of running is inherently bouncy as our muscle tendon units act as springs to propel us up and forward. This aerial phase neck muscle contraction is in anticipation of the ground reaction force.  Ground reaction force causes a vertical acceleration of the head that actually pitches the head forward at foot strike.  

The human head uses a self-stabilizing system that does not rely on muscular reflex to control the pitching action during running. Reflex alone cannot control the action of the head once ground strike occurs – having fewer than then 10 milliseconds to control the up and forward action of the head is not enough time for our natural reflexes.

Our head, which is pitched forward upon landing, also rolls and yaws. This requires contractions of neck extensors, as well as flexors and a downward swing of an arm that dampens vertical acceleration. Each arm constitutes about eight percent of total body mass, roughly the same relative percent as the 5 to 6 kilogram runner’s head. If you consider the head in running as the primary mass then the downward swing of the stance side arm becomes the counter mass accelerating in the opposite direction, thereby dampening the skull’s oscillation. The athlete then alters their running form by bending and swinging his or her arms in movements with the appropriate power and speed to counter these varying vectors of force.  Changing the mass or active stiffness of the arms through strength training and not addressing the mass and/or muscular system of the head and neck can be problematic. The coach and athlete will spend countless hours trying to achieve a particular running form that cannot truly be corrected unless they address the musculature that is controlling the movement of the skull.

Running Form

There is another issue that the neck must attend to during running. When we land during sprinting we avoid falling down by utilizing the muscles of the lower back and hip – particularly the largest muscle of our body, the powerful gluteus maximus – to decelerate the trunk. As the trunk accelerates forward and then backward the head and neck accelerates backward then forward. Try this at home: Sit in your car and accelerate quickly forward then step on the brake. Vehicle acceleration provides example that the more the trunk pitches the more the head reacts. Increasing the strength and/or mass of the trunk and not addressing the strength and/or mass of the head and neck adversely effects athleticism.

As mentioned, the head also rolls and yaws during running, usually towards the stance side foot at foot strike.  Once the runner is in the aerial phase one leg quickly swings forward while the opposite leg is thrust behind the body, causing angular momentum around the vertical axis. We counteract this by swinging our arms in an opposite phase to the legs to have an equal and opposite angular momentum. The neck must not only rotate in the opposite direction of the trunk but quickly prepare for being thrust vertically and forward upon landing.

The human brain is encased in a rigid skull and covered by a muscular scalp which is surrounded by three layers of membranes and floats in a protective cushion of cerebrospinal fluid. Though protected, brain trauma can occur with sudden acceleration or deceleration within the cranium. Control of head stabilization is one important line of defense for protecting the brain from perturbation.   During activity, it remains relatively stable as we integrate information about the head and body from our eyes, vestibular system and proprioceptors of the neck. For athletes involved in any sport with an associated head trauma risk, protecting the brain from excessive subconcussive forces through strength training head and neck musculature for bracing is the first job of a strength and conditioning coach.

For any athlete to excel in sport, they must train the structures that decelerate opposing masses. This means that athletes must have head and neck training as part of their exercise regime. The head and neck muscles are countering arm swing, trunk pitch and rotation, as the arms are countering head pitch, leg swing and trunk movement. Developing one area and neglecting another is not conducive to optimal athletic development or performance. Train the entire system.

describe the image

Muscle Tissue Middle Age

When strength training to gain muscular weight it is common knowledge you need to add calories to your diet to maintain the newly developed tissue. When you reach middle age things change. Ageing results in a gradual decrease in size and volume of lean muscle and its subsequent mass reduces each decade. Though part of the strategy for maintaining muscle mass in middle age is similar to when you were young, that is to habitually be active and strength train; to slow the gradual loss of muscle the nutritional approach necessary to maximize maintaining lean muscle is actually counterintuitive.

Researchers have found that caloric restriction attenuates age-related muscle loss. In aged muscle restricting calories leads to metabolic reprogramming of the pathways to derive energy. For the science based reader it means that there is a decreased dependency on glycolysis and an increased cellular dependency on oxydative phosphorylation. It is speculated that you should reduce the amount of calories you need by 8% when you reach midlife, which inturn allows you to maintain the highest amount of muscular tissue. It is also recommended by researchers that the protein you eat is high in leucine (leucine is the dietary amino acid that has the capacity to directly stimulate muscle protein synthesis) with foods such as cheese, soybeans, beef, chicken, pork, nuts, seeds, fish, seafood, and beans.  

The bottom line is as you age eat less to maintain more. Get Strong and Stay Strong.        

Training Middle Age    

Getting A Grip On Life

A person’s chronological age can be quite different from their biological age. Scientists perpetually are on the lookout for the biomarkers that they can put together to most approximate one's demise. Though there is no exact definition for biological age, it generally indicates whether the body is functioning better or worse than its chronological age.

Recently, Gretchen Reynolds wrote an article in the New York Times, 'Older Athletes Have a Strikingly Young Fitness Age.' The article discussed how researchers have surmised that athletic seniors are typically 20 years or more younger physically than their chronological age compared to their non-athletic constituents. Looking at epidemiological studies those who are fitter generally have a longer life span. Getting fit and having the ability to change one's fitness age should be a viable reason to exercise.

The 2015 Lancet Medical Journal recently published, 'Grip strength and mortality: a biomarker of ageing?'  It was discussed that grip strength is simple to measure yet a powerful predictor of future disability, morbidity and mortality at any age. It may go as far as identifying an individual’s risk for having a heart attack or stroke or dying from cardiovascular disease.

Researchers found that an 11-pound decrease in grip strength over the course of their study was linked to a "16% higher risk of dying from any cause, a 17% higher risk of dying from heart disease, a 9% higher risk of stroke and a 7% higher risk of heart attack."

This is the largest study to have made this connection, as well as it was determined that grip strength was a relevant measure across high-income, middle-income and low-income in all countries.

Keeping fit and Getting Strong changes your life.

describe the image

 Measure Your Grip Strength With The Pendulum Power Grip Pro

Sleep, Knees And Spine

The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis. Over time the protective cartilage on the ends of the bones begins to wear. All joints in the body are susceptible and in athletics osteoarthritis is often seen earlier than normalespecially in the knees and spine. A population based study in the journal Spine found heavily active people getting less than 7 hours of sleep per day, have a remarkably higher prevalence of arthritis in the lower back than those who sleep longer.


When there is too much or abnormal loading risk factors for lumbar muscle strain and lumbar disc degeneration are elevated. If an athlete has a shorter sleep time the lumbar muscles and discs are under tension for a longer period. Therefore, this status may lead to further lumbar degeneration and be related to low back osteoarthritis.

Dr. Brian Hainline, Chief Medical Officer of the National Collegiate Athletic Association recently addressed the Collegiate Strength Coaches at their National Convention. He discussed the extensive issue of sleep deprivation in collegiate athletics. He explained how lack of sleep increases sports injury risk and pointed to a study whose findings indicated, "if an athlete is progressively sleep deprived over a period of 12 weeks, their neuromuscular performance will continue to diminish, even when the athlete believes that, after three days, they are back to normal."

Not only does sleep deprivation increases the risk of overuse and fatigue injuries but is often associated with signs of depression, anger, feelings of tension, anxiety and all the symptoms associated with attention deficit disorder. 

College students are among the most sleep-deprived people in the country. According to a 2014 study in the Journal of Nature Science and Sleep, 50% of college students report daytime sleepiness and 70% attain insufficient quality.  A comprehensive study at an independent college preparatory school showed increased sleep duration after a delay in school start time. When school was started at 8.30 am, 30 minutes later than usual, sleep duration was increased by 45 minutes on school days. 

Serious training requires adequate sleep. Early morning workouts must be well thought out and scheduled to ensure that athletes are getting adequate sleep and peak performance. Coaches need to consider sleep if they want to Get and keep their athletes healthy and Strong.

describe the image

All Posts