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Wall Mount Dip Station - New At Rogers Athletic

dip station

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Training The Traps

To maximize trap development the lifter should incorporate a movement for the upper, middle and lower traps in their workout. The upper trap requires fixation of the hands when using a neck machine to target the appropriate musculature. The upper trap can also be isolated by performing a one arm movement. When doing so, it is necessary to also grasp an object with the contralateral limb to stabilize the spine. 

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Standing shrugs, seated shrugs, and high pulls develop the middle trapezius. Remember; with two hands on a barbell, machine, or with a pair of dumbbells no matter how high you raise your shoulders you are still capable of extending your head. Therefore, the upper trapezius, a strong extensor, is only involved minimally and the exercise cannot to be considered an upper trap movement.

 Pendulum 5 Way Neck Shrugs

The third movement necessary to fully train the trapezius is a lower trap movement. Lean forward on the 3-way row with your palms up and squeeze your shoulder blades together holding each rep for a five count at the top of the repetition. 

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A simple trapezius program:

1). Seated Pendulum neck extensions.... 8-10 repetitions

2). Seated Pendulum two arm shrugs..... 8-10 repetitions

3). One arm Pendulum shrugs................8-10 repetitions  

4). Underhand scapula retraction............6-8 repetitions wit a 5 second hold

5). Pendulum 3-Way Rows underhand......8-10 repetitions

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Get the traps Strong.

Upper Back Routine

Start by doing a set of 10-15 repetitions with a neutral grip on the Pendulum 3-Way Row machine.



Once the rowing exercise is completed go to the Pendulum Rope Pull positioned on the Pendulum Power Rack and pull the rope upwards at approximately an 80 degree angle. You must completely pull the rope from beginning to end. The tension on the Rope Pull should be set at the same tension it would take you to pull the rope completely through in 30 seconds when the rope pull is your first exercise of the workout.



Once completed start at the top of the chin up bar and try to lower yourself to a straight arm position in 90 seconds. If this can be accomplished add weight the next workout. Record your time.



When the negative chin is completed set the Pendulum Rope Pull so you are pulling the rope end to end at a 45 degree angle. The resistance remains the same as the previous rope pull. RLC6742

Upon completion set your Pendulum Adjustable Chin/Dip Bar so your body is at a 45 degree angle. With your feet always remaining on the floor and your body straight do as many pulls to the bar as possible.



1). Pendulum 3-Way Row... 10-15 Repetitions

2). 80 degree Pendulum Rope Pull from the floor

3). 90 second Negative Chin

4). 45 degree Pendulum Rope Pull

5). 45 degree Pendulum Chin/Dip bar pull... maximum repetitions 

A great way to Get your upper back Strong.

Pendulum 3-Way Row

Besides an underhand grip for the lower traps the Pendulum 3-Way Row allows for a wide variety of exercises. A great tool to train the upper back, posterior shoulder and Get Strong.

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 Pendulum 3 Way Row

3 Way Post Shoulder


Squat Like A Pro

When you use the Pendulum Squat Pro you are always able to squat with excellent form. Squat like a Pro with Pendulum. Get Strong.

Squat like a pro

Pendulum Squat Pro

The Pendulum Squat Pro

West Virginia Mountaineer Women

West Virginia Mountaineer Women

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Strength training on the Pendulum Seated Squat in Morgantown, West Virginia to Get Strong.  

Grip Cart

New York Jets Pendulum Grip Cart 

NY Jets grip Cart 1

NY Jets grip Cart2

Wrist Roller Shape

The shape of an object influences our finger and wrist joint posture when we grasp it. This subsequently alters the grip force distribution of the hand during maximal power grip tasks.

When training the hands the type of wrist roller affects the maximal grip force that can be achieved.  The contour, size and surface area of the implement increases the user's torque and dictates which muscles are affected which contributes to the exerciser's ultimate physical capacity.

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Normal force and contact area can be explained by the interaction between handle size and hand size. Hand area can be estimated by hand length times width. Knowing different muscle coordination strategies are used depending on a wrist rollers shape, Rogers Athletics has developed elliptical, circular, cubical and double-frustum wrist rollers of different thicknesses for exercising specific regions of the fingers, hands, wrists and forearms.

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Having the ability to train the various types of anatomical grips i.e., precision, pinch, hook, ball, power, abduction and adduction with the appropriate tool maximizes hand strength. Filling your grip cart with an implement for each of the above said movements and educating each athlete how to utilize each roller insures that the trainee develops all the structures of the hand fully.

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Choose from a wide variety of wrist rollers to fill your grip cart. 

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The following are a few of the many types of wrist rollers available from Rogers to Get Strong.

power grip 

Large Ergonomic Power Grip

small power grip

Natural Power Grip

ball grip

Ball Grip

pinch grip

Rogers large Pinch Grip Wrist Roller 

Penn State Wrestling

Penn State Wrestlers Get Strong

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Pendulum 4 Way Head and Neck Machine

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Pendulum Hip Press

MX 4 Heavy-duty Modular Training System

The MX-4 is a heavy-duty modular training tool built for the toughest competitor, soldier or weightlifer. Built by Rogers Athletics, Tyler Hobson, and steel donated by the Semper-Fi Fund, the goal was achieved in creating a multi-station strength training system, that was wheelchair accessible, but one that did not compromise the demands of performance athletes.


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MX 4 Hobson

MX 4 Jossan Warrior Medical


Neck Muscle Strength, Bracing And Training The System

describe the imageMike Gittleson was the Director of Strength & Conditioning at the University of Michigan for 30 years and was a part of 15 Football Championships in that time. He explains, developing one area and neglecting another is not conducive to optimal athletic performance.

On January 31, 2014 the American Journal of Sports Medicine published an article on neck strength titled, Effect of Neck Muscle Strength and Anticipatory Cervical Muscle Activation on the Kinematic Response of the Head to Impulsive Loads. The findings indicated that male and female athletes could potentially modify risk factors for concussion by developing neck musculature. It was shown that having greater neck strength when bracing for impact reduces the magnitude of the head’s kinematic response. The anticipatory act of bracing for a violent collision is important in protecting oneself from the effects of whiplash, yet bracing in itself is a common occurrence.  When you run, neck muscles contract before your foot hits the ground. The process of running is inherently bouncy as our muscle tendon units act as springs to propel us up and forward. This aerial phase neck muscle contraction is in anticipation of the ground reaction force.  Ground reaction force causes a vertical acceleration of the head that actually pitches the head forward at foot strike.  

The human head uses a self-stabilizing system that does not rely on muscular reflex to control the pitching action during running. Reflex alone cannot control the action of the head once ground strike occurs – having fewer than then 10 milliseconds to control the up and forward action of the head is not enough time for our natural reflexes.

Our head, which is pitched forward upon landing, also rolls and yaws. This requires contractions of neck extensors, as well as flexors and a downward swing of an arm that dampens vertical acceleration. Each arm constitutes about eight percent of total body mass, roughly the same relative percent as the 5 to 6 kilogram runner’s head. If you consider the head in running as the primary mass then the downward swing of the stance side arm becomes the counter mass accelerating in the opposite direction, thereby dampening the skull’s oscillation. The athlete then alters their running form by bending and swinging his or her arms in movements with the appropriate power and speed to counter these varying vectors of force.  Changing the mass or active stiffness of the arms through strength training and not addressing the mass and/or muscular system of the head and neck can be problematic. The coach and athlete will spend countless hours trying to achieve a particular running form that cannot truly be corrected unless they address the musculature that is controlling the movement of the skull.

Running Form

There is another issue that the neck must attend to during running. When we land during sprinting we avoid falling down by utilizing the muscles of the lower back and hip – particularly the largest muscle of our body, the powerful gluteus maximus – to decelerate the trunk. As the trunk accelerates forward and then backward the head and neck accelerates backward then forward. Try this at home: Sit in your car and accelerate quickly forward then step on the brake. Vehicle acceleration provides example that the more the trunk pitches the more the head reacts. Increasing the strength and/or mass of the trunk and not addressing the strength and/or mass of the head and neck adversely effects athleticism.

As mentioned, the head also rolls and yaws during running, usually towards the stance side foot at foot strike.  Once the runner is in the aerial phase one leg quickly swings forward while the opposite leg is thrust behind the body, causing angular momentum around the vertical axis. We counteract this by swinging our arms in an opposite phase to the legs to have an equal and opposite angular momentum. The neck must not only rotate in the opposite direction of the trunk but quickly prepare for being thrust vertically and forward upon landing.

The human brain is encased in a rigid skull and covered by a muscular scalp which is surrounded by three layers of membranes and floats in a protective cushion of cerebrospinal fluid. Though protected, brain trauma can occur with sudden acceleration or deceleration within the cranium. Control of head stabilization is one important line of defense for protecting the brain from perturbation.   During activity, it remains relatively stable as we integrate information about the head and body from our eyes, vestibular system and proprioceptors of the neck. For athletes involved in any sport with an associated head trauma risk, protecting the brain from excessive subconcussive forces through strength training head and neck musculature for bracing is the first job of a strength and conditioning coach.

For any athlete to excel in sport, they must train the structures that decelerate opposing masses. This means that athletes must have head and neck training as part of their exercise regime. The head and neck muscles are countering arm swing, trunk pitch and rotation, as the arms are countering head pitch, leg swing and trunk movement. Developing one area and neglecting another is not conducive to optimal athletic development or performance. Train the entire system.

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