Subscribe by Email

Your email:

Coach's Questions

Send in your question and we will connect with an expert or two to get you an answer!

Wall Mount Dip Station - New At Rogers Athletic

dip station

Get Strong

Current Articles | RSS Feed RSS Feed

Training The Traps

To maximize trap development the lifter should incorporate a movement for the upper, middle and lower traps in their workout. The upper trap requires fixation of the hands when using a neck machine to target the appropriate musculature. The upper trap can also be isolated by performing a one arm movement. When doing so, it is necessary to also grasp an object with the contralateral limb to stabilize the spine. 

D73A1064 small

D73A1857 small

Standing shrugs, seated shrugs, and high pulls develop the middle trapezius. Remember; with two hands on a barbell, machine, or with a pair of dumbbells no matter how high you raise your shoulders you are still capable of extending your head. Therefore, the upper trapezius, a strong extensor, is only involved minimally and the exercise cannot to be considered an upper trap movement.

 Pendulum 5 Way Neck Shrugs

The third movement necessary to fully train the trapezius is a lower trap movement. Lean forward on the 3-way row with your palms up and squeeze your shoulder blades together holding each rep for a five count at the top of the repetition. 

D73A0768 edit resized 600

D73A0769 edit resized 600 

A simple trapezius program:

1). Seated Pendulum neck extensions.... 8-10 repetitions

2). Seated Pendulum two arm shrugs..... 8-10 repetitions

3). One arm Pendulum shrugs................8-10 repetitions  

4). Underhand scapula retraction............6-8 repetitions wit a 5 second hold

5). Pendulum 3-Way Rows underhand......8-10 repetitions

describe the image

Get the traps Strong.

Upper Back Routine

Start by doing a set of 10-15 repetitions with a neutral grip on the Pendulum 3-Way Row machine.



Once the rowing exercise is completed go to the Pendulum Rope Pull positioned on the Pendulum Power Rack and pull the rope upwards at approximately an 80 degree angle. You must completely pull the rope from beginning to end. The tension on the Rope Pull should be set at the same tension it would take you to pull the rope completely through in 30 seconds when the rope pull is your first exercise of the workout.



Once completed start at the top of the chin up bar and try to lower yourself to a straight arm position in 90 seconds. If this can be accomplished add weight the next workout. Record your time.



When the negative chin is completed set the Pendulum Rope Pull so you are pulling the rope end to end at a 45 degree angle. The resistance remains the same as the previous rope pull. RLC6742

Upon completion set your Pendulum Adjustable Chin/Dip Bar so your body is at a 45 degree angle. With your feet always remaining on the floor and your body straight do as many pulls to the bar as possible.



1). Pendulum 3-Way Row... 10-15 Repetitions

2). 80 degree Pendulum Rope Pull from the floor

3). 90 second Negative Chin

4). 45 degree Pendulum Rope Pull

5). 45 degree Pendulum Chin/Dip bar pull... maximum repetitions 

A great way to Get your upper back Strong.

Pendulum 3-Way Row

Besides an underhand grip for the lower traps the Pendulum 3-Way Row allows for a wide variety of exercises. A great tool to train the upper back, posterior shoulder and Get Strong.

describe the image

 Pendulum 3 Way Row

3 Way Post Shoulder


Cincinnati Bengals Weight Room

Cincinnati Bengals Weight Room Pendulum Equipment
describe the image
Pendulum Seated Squats
IMG 0568
Pendulum 5 Way Neck Machines
Pendulum 3 Way Rows
describe the image
Pendulum Hip Presses

Finishing The Pendulum Row

A 'finishing' movement following the Pendulum 3-Way Row makes the difficult...difficult.



Finishing a workout with the Patented Pendulum Rope Pull is a great way to Get Strong.

Head and Neck Training

describe the imageMike Gittleson was the Director of Strength & Conditioning at the University of Michigan for 30 years and was a part of 15 Football Championships in that time. He explains, there are methods for lowering the risk and reducing the number of sport-related concussions across America.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) – which is used interchangeably with the term concussion – as a complex pathophysiologic process affecting the brain, induced by traumatic biomechanical forces secondary to direct or indirect forces to the head. A concussion or MTBI can be caused by a blow or a jolt to the head or body that disrupts the function of the brain.

There are methods for lowering the risk and reducing the number of sport-related concussions across America. Some of the factors are return to play, rules changes, the number of exposures, skill development, protective equipment and strength training to lower subconcussive forces. All of these considerations play a part in abatement of concussion. Exclusion of any one item affects the safety of the student-athlete. Each factor must be reviewed by the professional who, by using assiduity and diligence, can and will have a positive impact on risk.

describe the image

Preventative sports medicine is the hallmark of any strength and conditioning program. The first goal of a professional is to develop effective and practical ways to reduce the number of sports-related injuries.

In the 1970s, collegiate programs began introducing strength training into their athletic programs to enhance performance as well as reduce injuries. There was very little research on the subject of weight training and athletics and many misnomers about strength training in general. At the time, the majority felt strongly that the use of barbells and strength training devices would inhibit athleticism by bulking and stiffening the athlete. Women, in general, had a strong fear of becoming too muscular. Educators worked to dispel those fears and strength and conditioning programs are now commonplace throughout athletics. Though some wrongly conceived beliefs still linger today when it comes to training the musculature associated with the cervical spine.

describe the image

The benefits of muscular development are far greater than initially purported since the inception of strength training into intercollegiate athletics. One of the important functions of strength training has become the development of the muscle and tendon as a unit. The muscle-tendon unit attenuates and dissipates force. Developing a strong musculoskeletal system is what is needed to protect joints and reduce injuries. This attenuation and dissipation of force is not exclusive to particular joints in the anatomical system.

Dawn Comstock, associate professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health, collected data on 6,704 student-athletes in six sports: boys' and girls' soccer, basketball and lacrosse. Her results indicated that for every pound of improved neck strength, an individual reduces his or her concussion risk.

describe the image

Dr. Comstock from her years of injury surveillance points out the primary mechanism for concussion injury is athlete-to-athlete contact. The researcher then asked, "Did the athlete see the blow coming?" And she found that for the athletes who saw the blow coming – those who had a chance to activate their neck muscles – experienced less severe concussion.

The attenuation and dissipation of force and bracing before impact by activating neck muscles can lower subconcussive trauma. This is a great reason for training the musculature that moves the neck and supports the head.

There are many more reasons for an athlete to train this region of the anatomy. ‘Where the head goes the body will follow’ is an athletic axiom that coaches teach. Stand straight, place your fingers lightly on the nape of your neck. Without moving your head quickly move your eyes left and right. You will feel the musculature in your neck begin to contract. The eyes are not connected to the neck muscles but the brain is preparing the body for movement. Like our limbs it is important to move the head quickly. Training the head and neck will enhance performance.

The respiratory system’s process of inspiration and expiration involves much more than the diaphragm and the internal and external intercostal muscles. The scalene muscles in the neck are involved in almost every breath we take. The platysma and sternocleidomastoid are involved in heavy breathing. Injure or develop neck muscles and your body’s athleticism will be affected. 

Conventional wisdom suggests that strength training increases body mass index (BMI) in a positive way, but does it? BMI is a simplistic measure of body fat. It is calculated by dividing one’s weight in kilograms by the square of one’s height in meters. The derived results can then be compared to a chart of normative data provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). BMI is useful for the overweight and obese, yet it does have limitations. BMI may overestimate body fat in athletes and others who have muscular builds. The problem is this simple tool does not differentiate between fat mass and lean body mass. It has long been argued that heavily muscled, weight-trained athletes are healthy despite their BMI classification.

At issue is the athlete that increases muscle mass and vascularity significantly in all areas of the body but the neck region alters peripheral vascular resistance in an acute way. Peripheral resistance is a function of the internal vessel diameter, vessel length and blood viscosity. Having a large body and an undeveloped neck changes the force of the delivery system’s blood flow to the head.

The cervical spine’s associated musculature is regarded as an important proprioceptive organ for postural processes. The muscles are small with a high spindle density. You can think of this region as the hotbed of proprioception. Disturbances of gait can occur by interfering with, damaging, weakening or fatiguing the muscles of the head and neck. Training this region augments static as well as dynamic posture – our ability to balance.

The head and neck muscular system is a complex anatomical structure and has apparent muscle redundancy; that is, more head and neck muscle than degrees of freedom. It is been postulated that individuals exhibit a large variation of neck muscle activation strategies for accomplishing the same task intra individually, as well as between subjects. The health practitioner’s return-to-play protocol after a concussion, whiplash, nerve or muscle trauma must contain a measurable strength component to restore each muscle to normalcy, redressing this tendency to substitute by the injured athlete.

Head and neck muscles can be thought of as two distinct muscular units, the musculature that moves the head and the muscles that move the cervical spine. Each unit must be trained to maximize development and ongoing strength values collected. This aids in overall muscular fitness and post injury assessment in returning a student-athlete to their appropriate functional movement.

Injuries to the mouth, face and jaw are part of sport. Having a strong jaw helps in bracing, clenching against a mouth guard, and resisting the pull of the chin strap in helmets. Injured masseter muscles, strained temporalis, pterygoids, digastrics all must be rehabilitated and strengthened when damaged.

describe the image

To help lower subconcussive forces, protect the student-athlete returning to play, maximize performance and fitness, strength training of the head, neck and jaw must be inclusive when designing exercise programs.

describe the image 

Coaching Jobs

We are looking for current or former collegiate strength coaches that want to transition into the business world – but still coach. Hardpressed in Chicago was set up with the strength coach in mind. We are looking for coaches who want to strength train individuals, whether they are an athlete, former athlete or someone who never ever participated in sport. 

The client experience here is as great as the one experienced by elite athletes. Our employees are well compensated at Hardpressed, as we offer earning potential close to six figures annually. 

If you are a strength coach and enjoy coaching people hard and added job security appeals to you, we are accepting resumes.  Starting compensation is commiserate with experience. 

Squat Pro Dan resized 600

If interested, please email  We understand the athletic seasons may dictate the timing of career moves.  If you are interested, either now or in the future do not hesitate to send a resume.

3 Way (b) resized 600

 Pendulum 3-Way Row

Hip Press (1) resized 600

Pendulum Hip Press

Seated Squat resized 600

Pendulum Seated Squat

Pen Pulldown resized 600

Pendulum Lat Combo Pulldown 

Squat Pro resized 600

Pendulum Squat Pro

Bench resized 600

Leg Curl resized 600
Pendulum Leg Curl
3 Way resized 600

The Pendulum 3-Way Row

The Pendulum 3-Way Row is a multifaceted exercise device that allows an athlete to train in diverse manners.  When using the 'vertical handles' the latissimus dorsi muscles, the broadest muscles of the back become the prime movers.  Using the 3- Way's 45 degree 'v handles' the rowing motion becomes excellent for the lower traps and switching to an overhand parallel grip the posterior shoulder is trained.

An athlete can exercise one arm at a time or use the S.E.T. System to shorten or lengthen ranges of motion and without touching a plate easily do 'drop sets'.  Without question the Pendulum 3-Way Row is the single best strength training rowing machine ever built.... Get it and Get Strong.

describe the image

Training Pendulum 3 way row

Under Armour Performance Center

Under Armour Performance Center Powered by FX Studios at UA Global Headquarters is focused on increasing performance. Located on 1020 Hull Street in Baltimore, Maryland the Performance Center is a great place to Get Strong.

• Group Training sessions offered throughout each day

• State of the art sports, athletic and fitness training equipment

• Initial fitness, postural, and nutritional consultation using the latest technology

• Customized exercise program with measurable components to track your progress

• Focused attention from our trainers in a motivating, high energy environment

• Fitness and nutritional challenges

• Bring all or some of your current team 

• Work with Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists who build customized programs

3 Way Row

Pendulum 3 Way Row

Pendulum 3-Way Row

Pendulum Hip Press

Pendulum Hip Press

Under Armour Performance Center

Train Overlooking the Waterfront

The Pit FX Performance Center

The Pit

FX Studios

FX Studios Performance Center

Pendulum MX4

The Pendulum MX4 Modular Training System is a remarkable training tool that can be adjusted for athletes with many types of training limitations.

The people at Rogers Athletic strongly believe that quality exercise devices should not be limited to any particular group.  Tyler Hobson along with engineer Ken Staton and the Rogers Group developed an extensible strength training system with the exact strength curves and  the same smooth feel as the free standing equipment in their Pendulum line.  They also included a motorized pulley system so an athlete in a seated position can adjust the range of motion with the push of a button.


Making the perfect fit 

Warrior Fitness

Train on the MX4 to Get Strong.

All Posts