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Mike Gittleson

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Never Stop Training

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Oct 3, 2018 10:03:24 PM

There is compelling evidence that exercise is medicine and physical inactivity 'has profound deleterious effects on health. Even late in life an increase in physical activity has striking benefits. The decline of structure and function of muscle mass over decades may represent the most dramatic change to our physiological system. Maintaining lean muscular tissue must be taken seriously, it's decline effects mobility, overall nutrient intake and status, disease, mastication, pulmonary function and much more including our independence in daily living.

In a meeting on biologic gerontology in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1988 Dr Irwin H. Rosenberg recognized the serious need to label this loss of lean tissue and introduced the the term sarcopenia, which originates from the Greek roots of the word sarx for flesh and penia for loss. Fighting sarcopenia should be a goal. Maintaining a normal body weight and maintaining functional skeletal muscle mass should always be at the forefront of any intervention strategy to achieve “healthy aging”.

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Training on the Pendulum 4 Way Head and Neck Machine

Topics: Pendulum 4 Way Neck, Pendulum 5 Way Neck

Getting A Grip On Grip Strength

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Sep 27, 2018 9:15:07 PM

Each finger has a significant contribution to overall grip strength. It is obvious that the use of all 5 fingers (the 'power grip') enables the greatest hand holding ability. Grip strength without the thumb (the 'hook grip') is the second greatest way to provide hand strength. The largest contributor of the hand to developing power is the middle finger, next the combination of ring and little finger working together.  When gripping without all digits hand strength becomes lower. Knowing that each finger's power changes how you can hold on to, control or manipulate something, it is understandable that it is important to target each finger systematically during training. The Pendulum Grip Cart   http://www.rogersathletic.com/pendulum-grip-cart/  vigorously addresses each digit, as well as, the various ways the hand interacts with objects. 

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 The Pendulum Grip Cart 

 

Topics: Pendulum Grip Cart, Pendulum Gripper

The Neck And The Bicycle

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Sep 22, 2018 6:04:03 PM

Swim/bike/run competition originated in the 1920's in France. In 1974 the first 'modern triathlon' was held with 46 participants in San Diego, California. The sport has grown into a World, Olympic and a Paralympic event. 

bike picThe neck is among the most common overuse injuries in cyclists. As this physically demanding, wonderfully challenging, sport has grown so has the number of participants that have visited neurosurgery clinics with neck and back pain. It is a reminder that it is always important to train the entire system. 

In a study published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, "Neck pain in  multisport athletes." It was found in a questionnaire to triathletes that 64% had sport related neck pain.

The cycling portion of the triathlon requires neck extension posture. The neck extensors and traps are active for hours and as fatigue sets in the suboccipitals are stressed as the participant needs to keep eyes up and the  head often in full length neck extension to safely follow the road.

When preparing for biking, swimming, running or any sport, make sure head and neck is always an important part of your exercise program. Below Doug Scott the strength and conditioning coach for the Pingry School in Basking Ridge, New Jersey regularly includes neck strength training as part of his race regime. Doug recently finished the Lake Placid, Ironman Triathlon. Exercising at a competitive pace for 13 hours with zero complications is a tribute to his method, knowledge and training approach. Get Strong and Stay Strong to finish Strong.

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Topics: Muscular Strength, Pendulum 4 Way Neck, Pendulum 5 Way Neck, Neck training

Things To Do On The Pendulum Shoulder/Incline

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Sep 18, 2018 12:36:22 PM

The Pendulum Shoulder/Incline was designed to do an overhead shoulder press and then simply with little effort, quickly convert the machine into an incline press. Many athletes like to take advantage of the apparatuses capabilities by changing it into a bench press or a one arm exercise.  Doing drop sets using range limitation is an experience in exercise all should have. Try the most versatile pressing machine there is to Get Strong.

IMG_5988  Bench press on the Pendulum Shoulder/Incline

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Topics: Pendulum Shoulder/Incline

The United States Naval Academy

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Sep 11, 2018 9:22:48 PM

Training for Sport and National Defense    https://vimeo.com/288550350

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Topics: Pendulum 4 Way Neck, Pendulum 5 Way Neck

Grand Valley State University

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Aug 28, 2018 10:13:00 AM

Grand Valley State University Olympic Sports installs the Pendulum Rack System

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Topics: Pendulum Rack System, Pendulum Utility Bench, Pendulum Power Stack, Announcements

Range Of Motion And Hip Strength

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Aug 26, 2018 5:37:32 PM

To increase hip strength and range of motion, on the return phase of the Pendulum Hip Press, an athlete should bring their knees back towards their shoulders. 

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Training hip strength on a 'first generation' Pendulum Hip Press

Topics: Pendulum Hip Press

What A Squat Really Feels Like

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Aug 21, 2018 3:26:57 PM

The Pendulum Squat Pro has variable weight loading sites to alter the strength curve. When you top load the Squat Pro you make the squat heavier in the low position. This is where many struggle and need to be stronger to maintain form. When you bottom load the Squat Pro it makes the exercise easier in the low position but more difficult on the way to full extension. By cross-loading the machine the exact same strength curve as a barbell squat is achieved. 

The floating yoke of the Pendulum Machine allows the athlete to always maintain exceptional form during the movement. Range limiters on the side of the machine allow the user to modify the range of motion which is especially useful for rehabilitation, addressing coaching issues that an athlete may have and problems associated with ageing. 

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Squat like a Pro on the Pendulum Squat Pro to Get Strong

Topics: Pendulum Squat Pro, The Squat

Athletes Should Review - Rules Of Manual Resistance

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Aug 14, 2018 9:42:36 PM

Important Manual Resistance Considerations:

  • When training manually all athletes must understand the rules of performing each repetition properly. The rules of Manual Resistance must be reviewed regularly!
  • The athlete should not only be capable of performing an exercise but have the ability to teach, as well as administer the exercise to others. 
  • Once an athlete understands how to execute manual resistance it demands the same effort and motivation as if trying to improve on a bench, squat, clean or any other strength training exercise.
  • When training manually to progressively overload it requires a strength measurement to track progress.  Taking a circumference, body composition and other physiological variables allows the coach and athlete to monitor results.
  • Remember when training the head and neck manually athletes should have clean hands especially during flu season.

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Manual Resistance Rules

1). Each athlete must know and understand the rules.

2). The Lifter begins each exercise with the goal of 6-8 reps. This requires pacing, in other words, the first repetition is not an all out effort. The effort must be increasing for every subsequent repetition.

2a). The Spotter should allow the lifter to perform each repetition at the same pace or speed of movement. This will require different amounts of pressure by the spotter during the rep (because of leverage). The lifter will feel as though the resistance is similar at all joint angles (the resistance will feel smooth).

3). The lowering phase of every repetition should be slower than the raising phase. A guide in learning manual resistance is raise the involved limbs up in 1-2 seconds or at a 1-2 count and lower them in 4-5 seconds or at a 4 or 5 count.

3a). The Spotter must make sure that they feel more force by the lifter during the lowering phase of each repetition.

4). The Lifter should continually contract their target musculature during the raising phase and the lowering phase of every repetition.

4a). The Spotter must give feedback to the lifter to ensure there is always a constant contraction on every repetition performed. The spotter should identify any relaxation or loss of force by the lifter during the movement.

5). The Lifter should pause with pressure against the spotter's resistance at the top of every movement. Pausing with pressure and no relaxation is extremely difficult.

5a). The Spotter should insure the lifter is applying force at the top of the movement. The spotter must feel if the lifter is relaxing. The spotter must ease slowly into the lowering phase of the exercise. Slowly easing into the lowering phase or decent is extremely important.

6). The exercise is completed when the athlete reaches momentary muscular failure. 

Topics: Manual Resistance

Muscle

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Aug 10, 2018 9:17:01 AM

In February of 2014 the Journal of Investigative Dermatology , published the article 'The skin not the largest organ.' a good read. The Journal of Comprehensive Physiology in a published article - 'Muscle as a secretory organ.' - states,  "Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body."

As strength coaches we tend to think of muscle exclusively in relation to muscle fiber contractions, posture, breathing and the locomotion of our activities. Seldom do we think of skeletal muscle as a secretory organ and it's ability to communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, the liver, pancreas, our bones and the brain. 

Myokines are small proteins released by muscle cells in response to muscular contractions.  They are involved in  tissue regeneration and repair, inflammation reduction, reduction of the risk of chronic metabolic diseases and maintenance of healthy bodily functioning. Skeletal muscle as an endocrine organ produce and release these proteins, which like hormones, exert specific endocrine effects.

Understanding that inactivity leads to an altered myokine response and muscular work a positive healthy molecular return, illustrates the far-reaching effect of strength training regularly and continually throughout life. 

In our modern environment with televisions, computers, advanced technology, cell phones a sedentary behavior with little or moderate muscular work is commonplace.  With the physiological knowledge of the skeletal muscles contributions in Getting Strong more than walking and running alone are necessary to achieve what is deemed a 'healthy lifestyle'. 

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  Getting Strong on the Pendulum Power Rack System

Topics: Muscular Growth, Muscular Strength, Strength Training, Pendulum Rack System, Pendulum Chin-Up Bar, Pendulum Rope Pull