Blog Header

Electromyography, The Bench Press, The Chest Press

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Nov 8, 2018 7:30:12 PM

The Public Library of Science (PLoS ONE) published, "A systematic review of surface electromyography analysis of the bench press movement task." After reviewing 3847 articles and looking at which muscles displayed the greatest activity during a standard flat bench press, they found the pectoralis major and triceps brachii had significantly higher action than the anterior deltoids.  Exercise intensity, mental focus, fatigue, velocity, stability all effect electrical activity with the tricep brachii showing the most fluctuation in increases and decreases. 

The Pendulum Vertical Chest Press has advantages over the standard barbell bench. When an athlete is seated properly on the Vertical Chest the strength curve does not have a sticking point unlike a flat bench.  If seat height is adjusted higher than normal on the Vertical Press there is shoulder relief with the exercise targeting the pectoralis major muscles. This is a tremendous advantage for returning an athlete post injury. Setting the seat lower than normal puts the stress on the anterior deltoid, which can be felt immediately. 

The Pendulum Vertical Chest Press is the ultimate upper torso machine that maximizes development and allows for step by step progress through rehabilitation. A terrific way to Get Strong.

describe the image

All-Pro Jake Long - Pendulum Vertical Chest Press

 

Topics: Pendulum Vertical Chest Press, Muscular Strength

The Neck And The Bicycle

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Sep 22, 2018 6:04:03 PM

Swim/bike/run competition originated in the 1920's in France. In 1974 the first 'modern triathlon' was held with 46 participants in San Diego, California. The sport has grown into a World, Olympic and a Paralympic event. 

bike picThe neck is among the most common overuse injuries in cyclists. As this physically demanding, wonderfully challenging, sport has grown so has the number of participants that have visited neurosurgery clinics with neck and back pain. It is a reminder that it is always important to train the entire system. 

In a study published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, "Neck pain in  multisport athletes." It was found in a questionnaire to triathletes that 64% had sport related neck pain.

The cycling portion of the triathlon requires neck extension posture. The neck extensors and traps are active for hours and as fatigue sets in the suboccipitals are stressed as the participant needs to keep eyes up and the  head often in full length neck extension to safely follow the road.

When preparing for biking, swimming, running or any sport, make sure head and neck is always an important part of your exercise program. Below Doug Scott the strength and conditioning coach for the Pingry School in Basking Ridge, New Jersey regularly includes neck strength training as part of his race regime. Doug recently finished the Lake Placid, Ironman Triathlon. Exercising at a competitive pace for 13 hours with zero complications is a tribute to his method, knowledge and training approach. Get Strong and Stay Strong to finish Strong.

run pic


 

 

Topics: Muscular Strength, Pendulum 4 Way Neck, Pendulum 5 Way Neck, Neck training

Muscle

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Aug 10, 2018 9:17:01 AM

In February of 2014 the Journal of Investigative Dermatology , published the article 'The skin not the largest organ.' a good read. The Journal of Comprehensive Physiology in a published article - 'Muscle as a secretory organ.' - states,  "Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body."

As strength coaches we tend to think of muscle exclusively in relation to muscle fiber contractions, posture, breathing and the locomotion of our activities. Seldom do we think of skeletal muscle as a secretory organ and it's ability to communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, the liver, pancreas, our bones and the brain. 

Myokines are small proteins released by muscle cells in response to muscular contractions.  They are involved in  tissue regeneration and repair, inflammation reduction, reduction of the risk of chronic metabolic diseases and maintenance of healthy bodily functioning. Skeletal muscle as an endocrine organ produce and release these proteins, which like hormones, exert specific endocrine effects.

Understanding that inactivity leads to an altered myokine response and muscular work a positive healthy molecular return, illustrates the far-reaching effect of strength training regularly and continually throughout life. 

In our modern environment with televisions, computers, advanced technology, cell phones a sedentary behavior with little or moderate muscular work is commonplace.  With the physiological knowledge of the skeletal muscles contributions in Getting Strong more than walking and running alone are necessary to achieve what is deemed a 'healthy lifestyle'. 

IMG_6405

  Getting Strong on the Pendulum Power Rack System

Topics: Muscular Growth, Muscular Strength, Strength Training, Pendulum Rack System, Pendulum Chin-Up Bar, Pendulum Rope Pull

When You 'Knee' To Do Push-ups

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Aug 1, 2018 3:42:20 PM

Doing a push-up with your body straight and knees off the floor is harder than with them on the ground as it requires less trunk stability to maintain position. The question is: "What is the benefit of push-ups on your knees other than training the beginner or extending the exercise once the athletes strength fails to hold posture?"

26382637

In May of this year a study reported in the Journal of Applied Biomechanics measured the surface muscle activity of 8 upper body and core muscles during a push-up.  There findings were ....."there were no significant differences between push-ups on the toes versus knees with respect to the percent contribution for the primary muscle groups."   

As a coach this changes your thinking about the value of training  push-ups  from a kneeling versus extended position. Training a novice athlete with planks and bent leg  push-ups will quickly hasten the desired development for chest and trunk. Teach the athlete how adjusting their legs still adequately targets the primary chest muscles and is an important consideration when Getting Strong regardless of ones overall strength. This knowledge brings a new focus and enthusiasm to the modified position.     

2639 (1) 2640 (1)

 Push-up to Get the chest Strong 

Image result for pendulum vertical chest chest

 

 

 

 

The Pendulum Vertical Chest Press

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics: Pendulum Vertical Chest Press, Strength Training, Muscular Strength

Get A Grip On Strength When Asleep

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Jul 26, 2018 10:02:06 AM

The National Sleep Foundation has specific sleep recommendations for each age group ranging from infants to the aged population. The recommended ranges for appropriate sleep for teenagers is getting 8 to 10 hours, 7 to 9 hours for young adults and 7 to 8 hours for the older population. 

Examining sleep patterns over an 8 year period and measuring grip strength with hand held dynamometers the groups with longer and shorter duration then recommended have a faster rate of hand grip strength decline over time

When training to Get Strong sleep must be an important part of the equation as it is a major key to development. Stimulants like energy drinks, external lights including those from electronic devices interfere with our 'circardian rythms' or natural sleep/wake cycle. Eating properly, maintaining a healthy body composition and exercising are important, but the big picture in maximizing development is getting the needed hours of recovery to make a program work.

 Power Grip Pro

The Pendulum Power Grip Pro

Topics: Pendulum Gripper, Muscular Strength, Strength Training

Getting A Leg Up On Leg Extensions

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Apr 27, 2018 11:16:29 AM

The short arc knee extension is a partial leg movement that has been used for decades to target the vastus medialis oblique. This oft-spoken muscle, located above the inside of the knee cap, in rehabilitation has earned the byname 'VMO'.

The VMO is important in keeping the knee cap tracking correctly. During a knee extension the quadricep muscles are all active. From a 15"-0" arc, the VMO has about 56% more electrical activity. It is important in exercising to target the last 15" of movement. This is done by making sure you fully extend the legs and pause them at the top of a knee extension. Post injury the vastus medialis oblique atrophies noticeably and quickly - attending to the final degrees of motion hastens recovery.

The Pendulum Leg Extension machine has 'SET' - Set Extension Technology - which allows for VMO range limiting. When training, one simply adjusts the range limiter to it's last setting and the short arc movement can be prioritized. 

file2-2

Topics: Pendulum Leg Extension, Muscular Strength

Read The Manual Before You Begin

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Apr 1, 2018 7:11:33 PM

Important Manual Resistance Considerations:

  • When training manually all athletes must understand the rules of performing each repetition properly. The rules of Manual Resistance must be reviewed regularly!
  • The athlete should not only be capable of performing an exercise but have the ability to teach, as well as administer the exercise to others. 
  • Once an athlete understands how to execute manual resistance it demands the same effort and motivation as if trying to improve on a bench, squat, clean or any other strength training exercise.
  • When training manually to progressively overload it requires a strength measurement to track progress.  Taking a circumference, body composition and other physiological variables allows the coach and athlete to monitor results.
  • Remember when training the head and neck manually athletes should have clean hands especially during flu season.

D73A6125

Manual Resistance Rules

1). Each athlete must know and understand the rules.

2). The Lifter begins each exercise with the goal of 6-8 reps. This requires pacing, in other words, the first repetition is not an all out effort. The effort must be increasing for every subsequent repetition.

2a). The Spotter should allow the lifter to perform each repetition at the same pace or speed of movement. This will require different amounts of pressure by the spotter during the rep (because of leverage). The lifter will feel as though the resistance is similar at all joint angles (the resistance will feel smooth).

3). The lowering phase of every repetition should be slower than the raising phase. A guide in learning manual resistance is raise the involved limbs up in 1-2 seconds or at a 1-2 count and lower them in 4-5 seconds or at a 4 or 5 count.

3a). The Spotter must make sure that they feel more force by the lifter during the lowering phase of each repetition.

4). The Lifter should continually contract their target musculature during the raising phase and the lowering phase of every repetition.

4a). The Spotter must give feedback to the lifter to ensure there is always a constant contraction on every repetition performed. The spotter should identify any relaxation or loss of force by the lifter during the movement.

5). The Lifter should pause with pressure against the spotter's resistance at the top of every movement. Pausing with pressure and no relaxation is extremely difficult.

5a). The Spotter should insure the lifter is applying force at the top of the movement. The spotter must feel if the lifter is relaxing. The spotter must ease slowly into the lowering phase of the exercise. Slowly easing into the lowering phase or decent is extremely important.

6). The exercise is completed when the athlete reaches momentary muscular failure. 

D73A5819

D73A5845

D73A6106

Topics: Muscular Strength, Strength Training, Manual Resistance

Strength, Conditioning And Fitness Club

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Feb 15, 2018 7:25:55 PM

Lock Haven University is located on 200 acres in central Pennsylvania along the Susquehanna river. They are noted for teacher preparation and are strong in sciences, business and the humanities. They have over 130 clubs that provide the students with numerous experiences.

The Lock Haven University's Strength, Conditioning and Fitness Club recently arrived in Clare, Michigan to gain understanding of fitness manufacturing, weight room design and to become acquainted with the Pendulum exercise equipment. 

A great group, a great learning experience and a great day! Ask about bringing your strength team to Clare.

Lockhaven (1).jpg

Topics: Announcements, Strength Training, Pendulum Rack System, Pendulum Power Stack, Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Muscular Strength, Pendulum Shoulder/Incline, Pendulum Gripper, Pendulum 4 Way Neck

March To Minnesota

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Feb 13, 2018 3:14:40 PM

THE SCIENCE AND APPLICATION OF STRENGTH TRAINING

FOR HEALTH & HUMAN PERFORMANCE

 

March 9 & 10th, 2018

DAY ONE

Times and events for both days are subject to change

4:30 – 5:45pm Registration/Check-in

5:30 – 5:45pm Welcome and Introduction

5:45 – 6:45pm Keynote Presentation 1: Ted Dreisigner Ph.D. Isolated Strengthening of the Low Back as a Strategy for the Prevention and Clinical Management of Chronic Low Back Pain

6:45 – 7:30pm Special Topics Presentation: A Fireside Chat with Jim Flanagan

7:45 – 8:30pm Special Topics Presentation: Brandon Jonker Results and Application of the Repetition Duration Study; Comparing 30-30-30, 10-10, and 2-4 and Training Demonstration with James Fisher Ph.D.

8:30 – 10:30pm Social at Beacon

We invite all attendees to join for food and drink at Beacon (located in the hotel). Note: Drinks and food are an additional cost and are not provided.

DAY TWO

Early Morning Workouts at the Downtown Minneapolis Location – More information to come

9:00 – 10:00am Keynote Presentation 2: Luke Carlson The Philosophy, Strategy, and Tactics that Drive Business Growth.

10:15 – 11:15am Keynote Presentation 3: Mike Gittleson Stretching is Not What We Thought it Was (and the Lost Body Part)

11:15 – 11:45am Special Topics and Tactics: Discover Strength Staff

11:45 – 12:30 Lunch (provided with registration)

12:30 – 1:30pm Keynote Presentation 4: Rob Morton Understanding Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy: Protein Metabolism and Resistance Training

1:45 – 2:45pm Keynote Presentation 5: Michelle Segar Ph.D

3:00 – 4:00pm Keynote Presentation 6: James Fisher Ph.D Heterogeneity, Periodization and the Strength-Endurance Continuum

 https://www.resistanceexerciseconference.com/

 

Pendulum Hip Press

Pendulum Hip Presses

Topics: Muscular Strength, Strength, Pendulum 3 Way Row, Pendulum Hip Press, Muscular Growth, Strength Training

How Much Can You Press?

Posted by Mike Gittleson on Jan 17, 2018 3:40:26 PM

For the first three quarters of the 20th century if you wanted to inquire about a young man's strength the question was - "How much can you press?".  The overhead press was a relatively simple way to compare strength between individuals as it required little instruction. Simply pick a weight off the floor or walk up to a power rack and push it over your head if you wanted to see who was stronger than whom.

Initially, for maximum development and comparative results the press was performed in a strict 'military style'; hence it's name the 'military press'. The lifter was to keep a military posture with straight legs and back, locked knees while pressing the weight overhead. This kept the stress of the load on the shoulders. In 1928 because of it's popularity, the overhead movement become one of the three movements in weightlifting competition in the Olympics. 

Competitions, coaching, seeking an edge, along with the worldwide desire for countries to win caused the lift to lose it's militray form as lifters used every means and technique to circumvent the rules to place the weight overhead. Lean-back techniques, grip spacing, a slight hitching movement with ones' knees and the exercise turned into a quick push-press to accelerate and move rather than lift weight. Forgiveness in rules and the excessive body bend began to become acceptable. In 1972 the overhead press could no longer fairly be judged and was removed from Olympic competition.

In the 1960's Powerlifting, which required less skill became more and more prevalent. Those who had spent their time military pressing as part of their training, rather than bench pressing quickly found when they converted to the bench press exercise they were extremely strong even though they had never performed a bench press exercise in training.

The trainees that remained and continued as Olympic lifters, even though the overhead press was eliminated from competition, still found it necessary to continue the use of the overhead press in their training in order to excel in the clean and jerk.  

Rogers Athletic recognized the value of this shoulder exercise and developed the Pendulum Shoulder/Incline. The machine takes away the leverage advantages that athletes use to push rather than truly press weight overhead. And just as importantly the Pendulum Shoulder/Incline is constructed to ensure the lifters humerus is rotated properly during the movement making it a truly effective deltoid developer.

To build extremely powerful shoulder muscles and Get Strong choose this machine from Pendulum. It answers the question, "How much can you press?". 

MVL_0141.jpg

 

Topics: Pendulum Shoulder/Incline, Muscular Strength