Get Strong

Hamstring Flexibility And Injuries

There is no doubt that flexibility is an important component of fitness and stretching programs change plasticity. In the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, "The effects of hamstring stretching on range of motion: a systematic literature review," the overwhelming evidence indicates that range of motion of the hamstrings is increased with a variety of stretching techniques, variations of positions and durations of training.  The question remains: Will flexibility reduce hamstring injuries?

In a study just published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine looking at 450 males who played amateur sport, researchers found there was no relationship between hamstring flexibility and hamstring injuries.  Studies such as this only reinforce that programs must be well rounded and that conditioning, strength, warm up, and all facets of preparation are important in making ready for athletics.

In maximizing the strength of biarticular muscles, such as the hamstrings, ensuring the upper and lower portions of the appendage are equally trained will lead to greater muscular adaptation.

The glute/ham machine preferentially targets the lower part of the hamstring, the reverse glute/ham targets the upper hamstring. Strength training the entire muscle, warming up, remaining flexible and conditioning are all necessary and will lead to a reduction of injuries.

The Pendulum Glute/Ham

The Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham

Topics: Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Pendulum Glute-ham

'Go West, Young Man, Go West'

West Virginia football started in 1891, since then they have accumulated a 727–482–45 record and rank 14th in victories among NCAA FBS programs. They have a rich tradition in coaching from Clarence Spears, Art "Pappy" Lewis, Bobby Bowden, Don Nehlen, Rich Rodriguez and Dana Holgorsen. The Mountaineer's are known for their quickness, overall team speed and hard play, much of which can be attributed to their 'Master' Strength and Conditioning Director, Mike Joesph and his Staff. Mike oversees one of the great strength programs and facilities in the United States. 

20160909_115754.jpgPendulum 5 Way Head and Neck Machines

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Pendulum Seated Squats

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Pendulum Hip Presses

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Pendulum 3 Way Rows

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Pendulum Lat Combo Pulldowns

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Pendulum Leg Curls

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Pendulum Leg Extension

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Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham an Squat Pro's

Topics: Pendulum Seated Squat, Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Pendulum Leg Curl, Pendulum 5 Way Neck, Pendulum Gripper, Pendulum Glute-ham, Pendulum Hip Press, Pendulum 3 Way Row, Pendulum Pulldown, Pendulum Squat Pro, Pendulum Combo Lat Pull

Tools

Sport requires year-round training for excellence. Practicing and playing with limited time off heightens the risk of injury. Programs with numerous tools for training allow an athlete to increase strength and remain strong by addressing each issue that may arise.

West Virginia's men's and women's basketball program use many different exercise devices to train their athletes. Having a variety of tools keeps and Gets them Strong.

20160909_094419.jpgThe Pendulum Seated Squat 

20160909_093841.jpgThe Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham

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The Pendulum 5 Way Head and Neck

20160909_093938.jpgThe Pendulum Leg Curl

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The Pendulum Row and Hip Presses

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Pendulum Grippers

 

 

Topics: Pendulum Seated Squat, Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Pendulum Leg Curl, Pendulum 5 Way Neck, Pendulum Gripper, Pendulum Hip Press, Pendulum 3 Way Row, Strength

Using The Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham

The Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham is an exceptional strength training device that targets the oft-neglected proximal end of the hamstring muscle, as well as, the glutes and hips. The Reverse Glute/Ham is an exceptional rehabilitative tool giving the athlete the ability to train when he or she has a knee, ankle sprain, casted foot or other lower leg injury. Continuation of training at a high level allows for the retention and development of tissue which enhances return-to-play from injury.

The Reverse Glute/Ham has another use beyond normal strengthening that few may be aware of.  The unique exercise device can be used to safely identify a muscular weakness in the quadriceps that is rarely picked up on any other exercise, test or exercise tool.

Begin the identification process by choosing a weight that he or she can perform 25 reps, pausing at the bottom of each repetition, with their knees bent during the entire movement. Keeping the knees bent targets and fatigues the glutes.

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25 reps with the knee bent during each repetition

Upon completion of the 25th rep (which should be difficult) the subject then, without rest, extends their legs straight out as if standing up. The additional weight of the lower limb adds weight to the movement allowing the lifter to continue performing repetitions. The athlete brings his knees back in the bent position then extending his legs pausing for as many reps as possible. If the first weight was chosen properly the number of repetitions that can be achieved will be some number less than 10.

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Each rep is from bent to an exactly straight paused leg

Once the athlete can complete the last rep in full extension as seen above, he or she is to slowly return at a 5 second count, with the legs kept perfectly straight, to a vertical position if possible.  In the vertical position (if flexible enough) the athlete pauses each rep for 15 seconds. The subject continues repetitions until failure.  If there is a disparity in leg strength the weaker quadricep will begin fibrillating often shaking dramatically.  This will be very visible and will require direct exercise such as leg extensions and straight leg lifts to correct and return to normal in the future.  

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Topics: Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Strength Training, Strength

The Problem Is Not The Problem. It Is The Symptom.

The knee cap (patella) and the thigh bone (femur) form the patellofemoral joint. Seldom do individuals make it through life without experiencing patellofemoral pain making it one of the most common lower extremity issues seen by clinicians. 
 
When there is patellofemoral pain there is usually a loss of muscular strength of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) a quadricep muscle above the knee on the front of the thigh. If muscle strength is lost exercises like straight-leg raises, quad sets and short-arc leg extensions are often recommended.
 
Current research in the 2016 Manual Therapy Journal, "The outcome of hip exercise in patellofemoral pain: A systematic review." , indicates that the addition of hip strengthening exercises and in some cases hip exercise alone can have a positive effect on reducing knee pain.
 
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The Pendulum Hip Press was designed to specifically target the hip region, as well as, improve flexibility in the low position.
 
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If you top load the Pendulum Squat Pro the athlete strengthens their hips in the low position. If you do this movement with the knees always over the heel, keeping the shin perpendicular to the floor, their is less stress on the patellofemoral joint. 
 
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The Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham can be used to directly target the hips.
 
Three great machines to Get the hips Strong.
 

Topics: Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Strength Training, Pendulum Hip Press, Pendulum Squat Pro, Muscular Strength

The University Of Maryland

The University of Maryland installs Pendulum Machines to Get Strong.

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 Pendulum Machines getting ready to leave the factory

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Pendulum Neck Machines arrive at the University of Maryland

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IMG 20160129 152315702 resized 600Pendulum Hip Presses

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The Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham

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The Pendulum Vertical Chest Press and Pit Sharks

Topics: Pendulum Seated Squat, Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Pendulum 5 Way Neck, Pit Shark, Pendulum 4 Way Neck, Pendulum Hip Press, Pendulum Squat Pro, Pendulum Vertical Chest Press

Targeting The Hips

The barbell squat has always been considered the king of exercises targeting and developing specific areas of an athlete's structure has enormous benefits as well.

About 60% of a human's weight is in the head, upper trunk and upper limbs, about 40% of their weight is in the lower trunk and legs. When squatting the 60% upper torso imposes a load on the entire system during the movement, as opposed to an isolated exercise for the lower body, such as hip extension or a leg press. During the barbell squat to support the weight of the bar and the weight of the upper torso requires the neck, arms, shoulders, abdominal muscles and lumbar extensors all to be highly active during each repetition. If you want to specifically train the hip/glute/hamstring area, taking much of your upper torso out of the movement significantly increases the muscular activity of the chosen region to be worked.

Isolating the Hips:

To isolate the hips start by doing hip extensions with your knees remaining bent during the entire movement on the Pendulum Reverse Glute Ham. Once the exercise is completed move to the Pendulum Hip Press. The Pendulum Hip Press was designed specifically to target the 17 muscles of the hip region; the gluteal group, adductor group, the lateral rotators and illopsoas group. By pre-fatiguing the gluteal group with bent leg hip extensions and finishing with the Hip Press the athlete will Get their hips extremely Strong.

Training  Reverse Glute Ham

Pendulum Reverse Glute Ham

Training on Hip Press

Pendulum Hip Press

Topics: Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Pendulum Hip Press

Reverse Glute/Ham And Hamstring Injuries

Having a wide variety of training tools allows a coach and athlete to regionally target specific areas of the anatomy.  Choosing the appropriate exercises that specifically develops the upper or the lower section of a biarticular muscle can lead to an adaptation that protects an athlete from injury. The Journal, Science Medicine and Sport recently published an article that examined the anatomic distribution of acute hamstring injuries in a large population of football players. They based their findings upon their utilization of 'Magnetic Resonance Imaging' which produced detailed pictures of the tissue post trauma.

The study looked at the MRIs and determined the location of where each athlete sustained tissue damage to their hamstring. The locations of the hamstring muscle injury was first divided into proximal (nearest to the center of the body) or distal. Injuries then were classified as a specific type such as myotendinous junction (where the tendon and muscle bisect) or a location such as the muscle belly or myofascial (fibrous tissue surrounding or invested in the muscle).

Researcher found when trauma occurred, the long head of the biceps femoris was the most often injured, which was damaged fifty seven percent of the time normally at the proximal myotendinous junction.

Long Head Hamstring 

Common exercises for the hamstrings in weight rooms are leg curls, glute-ham raises and the Romanian deadlift. These are wonderful exercises yet they target the distal end of the muscle.

To best train the proximal end of the long head of the often injured bicep femoris an athlete should use the Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham. Repetitions emphasizing the eccentric or lowering phase of the lift and training to failure will decrease the stiffness of the myotendinous junction, which will mean a healthy strong hamstring and therefore a healthy strong athlete.

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Hamstring Training on the Reverse Glute/Ham

Getting Strong

Topics: Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham, Strength Training

The Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham

Having a wide variety of training tools allows a coach and athlete to regionally target specific areas of the anatomy.  Choosing the appropriate exercise that specifically develops the upper and the lower sections of biarticular muscles leads to overall greater muscular adaptation. 

The Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham was engineered to strengthen the hips, glutes and hamstrings. The machine also allows athletes with ankle sprains, casts, back loading issues and knees to continue to stay strong and get strong.

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When each repetition is performed from a bent knee position to a straight leg (the movement is as if the athlete was about to stand) the hips become targeted on the Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham. 

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Keeping the knees bent from the beginning of the movement to the finish of the exercise emphasizes the gluteal muscles.

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Keeping the legs straight and locked from start to finish, stretches and strengthens the hamstrings.
Three great exercises on one great machine.

Topics: Pendulum Reverse Glute/Ham